Skip to main content

About your Search

20110301
20110331
STATION
MSNBC 79
CNN 27
WMAR (ABC) 23
KGO (ABC) 22
KPIX (CBS) 20
WJZ (CBS) 19
KNTV (NBC) 16
WBAL (NBC) 16
WJLA (ABC) 12
WUSA (CBS) 9
WRC (NBC) 7
LANGUAGE
English 250
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 250 (some duplicates have been removed)
but they have gotten weaker. one thing i want to point out as you talk about those image as, japan is a country that is relatively well prepared for earthquakes. so, the iimages you're seeing s to the magnitude of the quake we felt earlier today. you know, this is a country that has, you know, plenty of earthquake drills. we feel earthquakes out here all the time. nothing like we felt earlier today in a long time. >> were people heeding those evacuation warning in tokyo? did you see people exiting all those buildings in that densely populated area? >> reporter: know, it's tough to see from our vantage point but based on the images i have seen, i can tell you japanese people take their earthquakes very seriously because they get so many of them. they are looking into the warnings, they are making sure out on the coast at least, to seek higher ground and stay there until they hear otherwise. also people who were inside the buildings evacuating, doing exactly as they were told. >> i'm sure that's definitely the situation in sendai, which we keep going back to because the images are so inkred pibl.
earthquake hit japan friday afternoon. this happened about an hour and 15, 20 minutes ago. japan's meteorological agency says the earthquake measured 8.4. the agency issued a tsunami warning for japan's pacific cost. in northern japan tsunami waves of up to 4 meters were observed soon after the quake. the agency is warning the tsunami could be between 6 and 10 meters. you're seeing some of the tsunami damage so far in miyagi prefecture in the sendai area where some of the homes and farms have been flooded when the tsunami went upstream a river. according to the transport ministry, the international airport has reopened two of its four runways. international airport has reopened two of its four runways. they had earlier closed all. they have reopened two of its four runways. the japan road traffic information center, japan road information center, and police say express ways around tokyo and northeastern japan have been closed. the japan road traffic information center and police say expressways around tokyo and northeastern japan have been closed. according to toshiba elevator, i
. welcome to our viewers around the world. has the cnn special report on the ongoing crisis in japan. i'm don lemon. >> hello. over the next hour, an indepth look at the unbelievable tragedy that unfolded in japan in recent weeks, from the first tremors to a crushing tsunami, to the brink of a nuclear meltdown. >> and also the latest fallout from japan's nuclear disabled plant, and radiation exposure to the public and food supply. >> but first we have a disturbing story developing out of libya. >> there's video of an hysterical woman bursting into a tripoli hotel filled with journalists. her name is iman and she is screaming a horrifying story accusing 15 members of the militia of raping and beating her over a two-day movement. >> they moved to shut her up. all the while dragging her away from uncertain fate. they smashed cameras, including ours, trying to destroy the evidence. we did get this video of it. let's get to nick robertson who is staying at that hotel for more. >> reporter: the lady came into the hotel this morning. she was screaming. she was a middle aged woman. she seemed f
>>> on the broadcast tonight, the disaster in japan. in the aftermath of the quake and the tsunami, now there's a full scale nuclear scare, and it's deepening. tonight the u.s. is being asked for more help. our team is on the ground and our coverage begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> a special good evening to our viewers out west tonight. we have all the very latest for you on the disaster in japan. it started with a freak of nature, the fifth largest earthquake ever recorded on the planet, but then right then as the rubble settled and the buildings stopped swaying, the water came ashore. the tsunami in japan killed thousands. in some parts of some towns, there's no remaining evidence that anyone ever lived there. and now tonight the crisis has taken yet another turn, and we are covering a full-blown nuclear scare in japan. there are 17 nuclear power plants across japan, 54 nuclear reactors, but one plant in particular is in trouble. it's the fukushima plant, and if you've seen the pictures of it over this past weekend, there was one explosion in one buil
, everybody, and thanks for joining us, i'm betty nguyen. this morning, the situation at japan's crippled fukushima daiichi nuclear power plant has gone from critical to desperate. the plant has suffered severe damage and so far, efforts to gain control have failed. here's the latest. a surge in radiation levels forced the remaining workers at the plant to temporarily withdraw. early this morning, a second fire broke out at reactor number four. this one may involve the outer shell of the containment building. and japanese officials also say the outer containment building of another reactor may have been compromised. charlie d'agata is in takasaki japan with more this morning. he joins us. good morning, charlie, what's the latest there? >> good morning to you, betty. the latest is, thankfully, the fire is out, and the plant's operators said they've been able to stabilize the temperature and the pressure in that critical unit. the reactor has gone -- at the same time the japanese government said it's now time to ask the military for help. efforts to prevent a full-blown nuclear disaster suf
>>> disaster in japan. efforts to control that crippled nuclear power plant have failed. officials admit burying the reactors in cement may be the only option left. as japan remembers the devastating quake and tsunami that hit one week ago today, changing their country forever. >>> and the battle for libya. the u.n. security council gives the okay for international military action against moammar gadhafi's forces. military action against moammar gadhafi's forces. but is it too little, too late? captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning, everybody, and thanks for joining us, i'm betty nguyen. the nuclear crisis in japan moves into its second week. and this morning, the head of the u.n.'s nuclear energy agency says japan is racing against the clock. here's the latest. engineers hope to reconnect electricity to at least two of the reactors at the fukushima daiichi power plant sometime today. but, it is unclear if any of the cooling systems will work. smoke is rising from reactor number 2, but officials don't know why. fire trucks are now being used to spray water on the plant, and att
of miyagi prefecture as well. some towns in japan are running out of coffins and body bags. one town was completely flattened, among the dead people who could not get out of their hospital beds. 1700 residents still missing. but in the middle of all of this destruction, an amazing rescue. an elderly man alive. he was found alive and he survived three days under rubble in miyagi, japan. rescuers scaried him out today. msnbc's chris jansing has made her way to tokyo, there live for us. chris, what are you seeing? >> reporter: well, i have to tell you, when you see that video of the one man being rescued you see there are a few glimmers of hope here. but they are indeed few and far between. the scenes have been absolutely unrelenting devastation. 1,000 bodies, as you said, washing up on one shoreline. they had been washed into the sea bi-the huge waves of the tsunami and are now coming back up. and in town after town after town in the northeast we are seeing millions of people who are about to spend their fourth night, it's 11:00 p.m. here in japan, without heat, without electricity, an
in japan. tasteless jokes. >> unbelievable news and disturbing news about a member of the charlie's angels cast. charlie sheen couldn't stay out of "the skinny" long. Ñ Ñ Ñ Ñ ÑÑ ♪ skinny so skinny >>> well, this was a big talker on facebook with our facebook fans yesterday. this gilbert gottfried comments, he made tasteless jokes about the tsunami in japan. some kind of joke he tweeted about, you know, a just broke up with my girlfriend but as the japanese say, another one will float by. really tasteless -- >> in japan, the beach comes to you, you don't go to the beach. >> he was the voice of aflac duck and they stepped in and said, not funny and canned him. he apologized saying, i sincerely apologize to anyone who was offended by my attempt at humor regarding the tragedy in japan. i meant no disrespect and my thoughts are with victims and their families. on top of that, some folks have rushed to his side saying, wait a minute, this isn't right, including joan rivers and howard stern. howard says here is a guy as long as i can remember making jokes about the n-word, jews. i mean, y
>>> disaster in japan. the crisis from friday's catastrophic earthquake and the tsunami that followed gets worse and worse. the death toll is surging. engineers are battling an expanding nuclear crisis that has forced the evacuation of nearly 200,000 people. the japanese armed forces are aiding in the search for thousands of missing. millions are without power or heat. and food and water are in short heat. and food and water are in short supply. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning, everyone, on a very busy monday. i'm terrell brown in for betty nguyen. three days after the fact the earthquake disaster in japan continues to snowball. the death toll from the nuclear and humanitarian crisis all growing this morning. here's the latest. it's now estimated that at least 10,000 people were killed by friday's massive quake and the tsunami that followed. tens of thousands are missing. early this morning, there was another explosion at a nuclear plant 150 miles north of tokyo. and a third reactor is in jeopardy after losing its cooling capabilities. some radiation has leaked
>>> this morning, japan's nuclear crisis grows. radiation, leaking faster than first thought from this crippled plant. >>> children and the elderly checked for exposure. millions still without enough food and heat. and the teetering economy requires another cash infusion today. >>> all of it, japan's biggest test since world war ii. >>> good morning. i'm peggy bunker. >> and i'm rob nelson. japan's nuclear crisis is growing even worse this morning. here's the latest from overnight. >> at the crippled fukushima nuclear plant, radiation is leaking from one of the reactors. thousands of nearby residents have been warned to stay inside. this morning, measurements show the radiation level at 400-times the safe yearly dose. >> and here, officials are keeping a close eye on this crisis. two navy pumping trucks are said to be on their way to that plant. >> and for thousands of japanese survivors, the situation is growing more desperate. they've now spent a fourth night with no food, water or shelter. >>> thousands, of course, are also worried about whether the government is being truthful
on the ground say these are the strongest that they have felt in days. the disaster in japan is reaching new levels escalating to what very likely could become a potential nuclear crisis. radiation from nuclear facilities is spreading after another explosion even japan's prime minister admitted there is a high risk of further leaking, but they insit right now that people should not panic and that the risk to citizens is still, to use their language, very low. some of the saddest images coming out of the town of minami-sanriku where the water poured into a hospital that now looks a lot more like a morgue. a nurse explained the water simply took everyone. 10,000 are feared dead across japan as a result of this the awful disaster. we do want to the focus on some of the hope, as well. five days after the quake and the tsunami, there still are amazing rescues taking place. some of them within the last several hours. today, both a man and woman survivors, and obviously the faces of hope, as well. >>> chris jansing, the host of this program "jansing and company" is in tokyo where she's following th
. "morning joe" starts right now. >> this is an international tragedy and although japan is a highly advanced economy and technologically equipped to rebuild, at this moment of crisis, it's important all of us join together in providing any help and assistance that we can in the days and months to come. >>> good morning. it is tuesday, march 15th. welcome to "morning joe." with us on set here in washington, msnbc political analyst, pat buchanan. also the washington correspondent for bbc world news america, catty kay, and former white house chief of staff of president george w. bush, andy card in the studio with us this morning. >> we will show some of the headlines just to show -- >> big ones. >> what a big story this is. catty, you lived in japan over three years. give us your insight on some images we are seeing. >> i was there for the kobe earthquake that was in 1995. we are all focused on the nuclear crisis. all of those families who have lost somebody, lost parents, you're hearing the japanese talking in muted ways about their loss. but for japanese, who find expressing emotion in public
>>> this morning, new images of japan's megaquake. the ground coming apart. and in the tsunami zone, debris everywhere. a bus ends up on top of a three-story building. >>> another concern, the nuclear crisis worsens. a new blast at an already-damaged nuclear plant. as the world reaches out, the u.s. military and rescue crews arrive on the scene. >>> we are live in japan, on this special edition of "america this morning." >>> and good morning, everyone. i'm rob nelson. >> and i'm peggy bunker. there's two, main concerns in japan this morning, coping with the huge scope of the humanitarian disaster. also, nuclear fares from three, crippled reactors. >> overnight, there was a new blast at the fukushima plant that was felt 25 miles away. and also injured several workers. so far, though, radiation levels are still within legal limits. >>> also today, 2,000 bodies were found on the shores. authorities there may ask foreign funeral homes to send supplies. >> and thousands of people are still missing. and the death toll, now, could pass 10,000. >>> and details on all of these developments,
hour. nuclear fuel rods in a reactor like the ones in trouble in japan are about 12 feet long, about 12 feet long. this is 12 feet long, and they are skinny. calling them rods isn't exactly right because they're not solid, they are hollow. this is made of cardboard so i can hold it. can you see it is hollow? it is essentially a big straw. that's what they call these fuel rods. these straus themselves, the real ones, are made of metal, a metal called zir cone yum. inside that is uranium. the working part of the reactor, the part that makes it nuclear. when the reactor is working, uranium pellets in the fuel rods are creating fission. they are creating a nuclear reactor to generate heat. the whole point of nuclear power is that you create an environment in which fission happens. a nuclear chain reaction happens, but it is controlled, so it does not produce an explosion. it just generates heat in a controlled way instead. use that heat to essentially boil water. actually, you literally use it to boil water. boiling water makes steam, steam spins a turbine, and that makes electric
of the globe and japan and the u.s. it would follow a little possible parcel of radiation all the way across the country and pacific. it would take many days. a lot of the radiation would be gone. there's just no threat. >> we will see. you'll keep watching, it as will i, but thanks so much for watching it here. want to turn things over to jessica yellin in "the situation room." jess, to you. >> happening now, breaking news. three nuclear reactors damaged to the core. the crisis in japan is said to be deteriorating right now. u.s. officials are suggesting the situation is more dire than many thought. with america's top nuclear watchdogs saying radiation levels are extremely high. freezing cold and snow adding to the hardship for quake and tsunami survivors there and hampering the rescue and recovery. more people now seem eager to get out of japan all together. >>> and wolf blitzer's one-on-one interview with secretary of state hillary clinton in egypt. she's talking about the disaster in japan, as well as the uprisings in libya and across the region. welcome to our viewers in the united stat
on "america this morning" and "good morning america," we'll take you back to japan for the very latest on the ongoing disaster. >>> in other news, the persian gulf nation of bahrain is under a three month state of emergency. a reaction to what's escalated into deadly political unrest. demonstrators are calling for political reforms and a change in bahrain's long established monarchy. the military force led by saudi arabia has been clashing with the protesters. so far at least three people have died and hundreds more injured. the u.s. navy's main base in the region is located in bahrain. >>> and in libya, moammar gadhafi's forces appear set for an offensive on the main stronghold of the rebellion there. opposition fighters were routed from a key city yesterday opening the way to their base in benghazi. in his newest comment gadhafi called the rebels rats and also claimed only hundreds not thousands have been killed in the fighting. >>> and with that, here's a look at your wednesday weather. a wet day from san francisco north with seattle expecting heavy rain. up to 2 feet of snow in the
. the "news nation" is following the latest on the nuclear emergency in japan where it is 3:00 a.m. local time. threat level is now being called a six out of seven by the french authority of nuclear safety. a watchdog group that monitors radiation safety. chernobyl, for some perspective here, was six out of serve. three mile island was rated a five. latest explosion in unit two of the fukushima plant may be the worst yet. international atomic energy agency says there's evidence it breached the primary containment shell. that means more radiation could be leaking from that unit. the iaea says radiation levels at site have been decreasing. people living within 20 kilometers of the plant have been evacuated and are lining up to be scanned for radiation. a no-fly zone has been established around the crippled nuclear plant for 30 kilometers. global economic fears, the stock market plummeted today because of the nuclear concerns and right now the dow, let's take a look at it, is down 178 point. it mentioned it opened down nearly 300 points earlier. today one of the biggest aftershocks to hit japan s
rundown." we will see you tomorrow. >>> and the nuclear crisis in japan worsens following an explosion at a third reactor and a fire in a fourth. high levels of radiation force 140,000 people indoors. could it happen here with a powerful earthquake off the west coast said to be overdue? we will talk to the head of california's emergency management agency. >>> and then there's libya. gadhafi's forces take the last rebel-held town west of tripoli, increasing pressure on the west to intervene. monday, secretary clinton met with opposition leaders. clinton is saturday seth to land in cairo he this hour. andrea mitchell traveling with her it is tuesday, march 15th, the ides of march. savannah is on assignment. the japan crisis weighs on the world market that at the opening bell. and saudi forces have entered bahrain there is a budget vote on capitol hill there is a fight on the right over sarah palin and general david petraeus testifies on afghanistan. that's all happening today. let's get to the run down but begin with japan and the nuclear crisis there a third explosion in four days at th
>>> right now on "andrea mitchell reports," president obama promising full support to japan as it tries to avert nuclear disaster and cope with the unfolding humanitarian crisis in wake of friday's deadly quake. this hour, can a nuclear meltdown be avoided? engineers are more troubled today than ever about that crippled nuclear react or. we talk with congressman ed markey sounding the alarm for stricter safeguards. >>> experts say the big one is coming to california. are the officials there ready. >>> in libya gadhafi forces expand strikes against rebels on the front. secretary of state hillary clinton arrives in paris to talk with european counterparts about imposing a no-fly zone. >>> labor fight. is the challenge over bargaining rights about to head to court? >>> i'm norah o'donnell live in washington. andrea is on assignment. we begin in japan where the humanitarian disaster is compounded by the potential for a nuclear nightmare. 250,000 doses of iodine are being distributed to evacuees as a defense to radiation. it follows explosions at two nuclear reactors, a third is
continue to in japan. >>> also, the nfl comparing locked out players to teachers and firefighters in wisconsin. do they have a point? >>> plus, are you smarter than a 12th grader? social security savings even cereal boxes what young americans are learning about managing their money. can you pass the test? pencils ready. show starts right now. >>> heartbreaking images continue to roll in from the devastation in japan and the unseen dangers at that failing nuclear plant may be more alarming. as it stands be officials estimate more than 10,000 are dead. a number that could easily grow. already 2800 deaths confirmed from the quake itself and the ensuing tsunami. at least, and i emphasize at least 15,000 more are still missing. japanese authorities in a race against the clock at this hour to reach buried survivors and to try to deliver tide increasingly cold victims. the most imminent threat at this hour, potential nuclear meltdown at japan's fukushima nuclear power plant where three nuclear reactors are dangerously close to overheating. power managers are in full scale panic according
going without tonight here in japan. obviously the radiation concerns continue to mount. what exactly will happen with those nuclear reactors? and what does it mean for people living in japan and around the world? we'll certainly try to continue to investigate and bring you more answers as we get them. thanks for watching a very special edition of "sgmd" from japan. much more cnn right after the break. >>> well, we've got more cnn for you right now. and we have some fast-moving developments in libya this morning. the picture you're seeing is of a fighter jet being shot down. this comes as pro-government forces now are pounding the rebel stronghold of benghazi. this happens as a defiant moammar gadhafi warns the world that any interference comes with severe consequences. and from japan this morning, reports that a week's worth of radiation leaks from severely damaged reactors have now led to contaminated tap water, milk, and food. president obama monitoring both global hot spots from brazil this morning. we will have a live report. >>> from the cnn center in atlanta, georgia, t
in japan are told to stay calm and stay inside as radiation leaks from a crippled nuclear plant and workers try to head off a meltdown. i'm katie couric. also tonight, for survivors of the earthquake and tsunami, a desperate search for food, water and missing loved ones. and on the u.s. west coast, fears of radiation results in a run on potassium iodide. but is there really cause for concern? captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. japan is dealing tonight with the aftermath of one catastrophe while trying to prevent another. we'll have much more about the earthquake and tsunami in a moment. the official death toll is nearly 3,400. but first, the nuclear crisis. radiation continues to leak from damaged nuclear reactors in fukushima, 140 miles north of tokyo. an estimated 50 workers are still trying desperately to cool them to prevent a meltdown. in the meantime, 70,000 people have been evacuated from an area within 12 miles of the dai-ichi plant and 140,000 more living with
official here in the united states says that the primary containment structure of those reactors in japan, it looks like has breached. it raises the risk now of a further release of radioactive material. let's go right to tokyo now. msnbc chris jansing is standing by. i received a note the winds have shifted and are blowing over the pacific sxnt over tokyo. i'm sure people there are very concerned. >> reporter: it's been a very concerning situation because there have been levels, low levels i need to emphasize that of radiation here in tokyo. it has caused enough of a red flag that the french government has advised its citizens to leave the capital. the austrian government is moving its embassy here to osaka. u.s. embassy officials nbc news has learned had a meeting earlier today with folks who work there, with their families to try to elay some of the concerns of americans living here in tokyo. it has been confirmed for us. we talked to people involved in the meeting that several people stood up and said, should i stay or should i go? that is the question a lot of people, especially peop
>>> good morning. disaster in japan. another explosion overnight rocks the crippled nuclear power plant, as concerns grow over a possible meltdown. along the shattered coastline, 1,000 bodies are found, as the death toll soars. the prime minister calling this japan's worst crisis since world war ii. millions today face another day with no power, no water, and no food. we have the very latest for you on the explosion, the survivors, and the worldwide humanitarian effort. "early" this monday morning, march 14th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> and thanks for joining us on this monday morning. you can see, these are just some of the images which have been coming in, and frankly, they speak for themselves. they're just unimaginable. >> the devastation that we first saw here friday morning, and now, in the days after this disaster in japan, we continue to get more images, more video of exactly the impact that this is having on this nation and the people there. damage estimates in the tens of billions of dollars. but, of course you can't put a dollar figure on the
allies meet on whether to take military action. it could happen as soon as today. >>> in japan, more fallout from the growing disaster. now there's a new threat to those who live near the nuclear reactors. we will have a live report. good morning, everyone. i'm alex witt. dramatic twists on the ground in libya and the threat of international military action. it is rapidliesque lating. this morning, shelling has been reported at the rebel stronghold of benghazi despite a cease fire gadhafi ordered on friday. renls say they shot down a pro-gadhafi fighter jet. in paris, a crisis meeting will begin shortly to detail what kind of military action the international community may take. action could begin within hours of this meeting. we have a live report from the region. >>> we have big news from japan this morning. workers are making progress as they frant ickically attempt to rebuild power lines to the reactors and hope to re-establish power at the fukushima daiichi sometime today but even if power is restored it is not clear if the cooling pumps will work. meanwhile, the japanese govern
can understand that we are in the middle here in japan of what appears to be an escalating nuclear crisis and so they continue to have these rolling blackouts. we saw some power going back on behind me there at the tokyo tower, but understand that this area alone has 45 million people requiring power so they're trying to conserve as much as they can. because a quarter of the power here has been affected by the devastating earthquake and tsunami. now, you also mentioned the rescuers, the americans who were contaminated. they are pouring in rescuers from literally all around the world, at least ten different nations. they've deployed 100,000 military here in japan, and we have seen them coming in at the airport. the sad fact of the matter is that these search and rescue teams will find little to rescue, although there were a couple of amazing stories today. a baby and an elderly man pulled from the rubble after spending three nights in it. but, for the most part, what they are finding is this tremendous devastation. in one town alone, an estimated 1,000 people who were washed away in
from the people of japan? the special comment coming up. >>> it's hard to believe, but with each passing hour the situation in japan is becoming more dire and dangerous. and today, this. another explosion rips through a nuclear containment building and this, the safety system at a third nuclear reactor within the stricken fukushima plant breaking down. the reactor's fuel rods exposed for more than two hours. and officials seem unable to determine just how much water remains, as they seek to prevent a full-scale meltdown. beyond the dangers surrounding nuclear plant, there's widespread suffering from sendai to tokyo. millions are facing a mull tide of challenge. officials struggling to balance rescue efforts to reach survivors, distribute aid and bury the dead. a thousand bodies washed ashore in the last few hours. search and rescue teams from some 13 countries have now converged on what will be a lengthy and complex operation. frantically working to find any survivors from the upgraded 9.0 magnitude earthquake and tsunami. in all, nearly 10,000 people have been rescued, while ten
york, but obviously the situation in japan continues to unfold. now 72 hours after the massive earthquake and tsunami. add to that a component of a nuclear situation that's still very uncertain. let me tell you what we know now. first of all inside studio 1a i'm matt lauer along with al roker and natalie morales. the death toll in japan is expected to exceed 10,000. there are lots -- thousands of people still reported missing. 11 workers have been injured during a second hydrogen explosion today at the fukushima daiichi nuclear plant. and the u.s. military has shifted some of the fleet a little further from shore after some personnel were exposed to a cloud of low level radiation. the state department is warning americans they should avoid travel to japan. that seems like good advice. >>> also ahead the devastating earthquake that hit on friday was the biggest in japan's recorded history, but the aftermath may be worse with the tsunami washing out swaths of coastal civilization. many areas are cut off. no rescue getting in and very little information getting out. >> plus, six n
>> i've done that. >> yes, you have. that's going to d >>> tonight from japan, this is "world news," reporting on the disaster in the pacific. now, there are four. four troubled nuclear reactors at one site. what happens if they all melt? and who are the 50 brave workers who agreed to stay inside and try to save everyone else? >>> we go out with rescue crews, calling out for signs of life in the rubble. "make a noise," they say. "is anybody there?" hello? is anybody there? is anybody there? and survivors did emerge today. >>> and we tell you what is the real danger for the united states. what about that run on potassium iodide pills? >>> and, on "world news," lessons for all of us, from survivors of that hiroshima radiation 60 years ago. >>> good evening to everyone in the united states. here in japan, as we said, there are 50 workers inside a nuclear power plant, and they are battling the complete unknown at this moment. trying to prevent a nuclear power meltdown. and in this breaking news, we have received word that there is another fire, a new fire under way at one of those reac
>>> good morning. disaster in japan. another 1,000 bodies washed up along japan's earthquake and tsunami-ravaged coast, as the nuclear crisis deepens, with a new explosion at an already damaged power plant. ann curry reports live from the region still reeling from the massive disaster today, monday, region still reeling from the massive disaster today, monday, march 14, 2011. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> the images continue to haunt us all. welcome to "today" on a monday morning. i'm matt lauer. >> i'm meredith vieira. japan's prime minister calling this the gravest crisis in his country since world war ii. >> the death toll is now estimated at 10,000. that's expected to climb. so far, about 2,800 people are confirmed dead including those 1,000 bodies discovered overnight. meanwhile, 11 workers have been injured during a second hydrogen explosion today at the fukushima nuclear plant and the u.s. military shifted some of the fleet further away from shore after military personnel were exposed to low level radiation. the state department is warning americans
coverage of japan as well. we want to thank you for watching tonight and "hardball" starts right now. >>> nuclear planet. this is "hardball." >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in los angeles. leading off tonight, japanese meltdown. the country of japan is confronting a grim reality three days after the massive earthquake and tsunami. thousands of bodies are washing up on the shore and the death toll is likely to go over 10,000 dead. and for many who survived the catastrophe, there's no power, no running water, and very little food. the disaster in japan is threefold. humanitarian and economic, but also nuclear. after several explosions at a nuclear reactor increased the threat of meltdown. we'll get the latest from the earthquake zone at the top of the show. plus, the nuclear crisis. can meltdown be avoided? what meltdown fears in japan mean for nuclear energy here in america. and later, the relief effort, overwhelming in a country that hasn't seen this level of hardship since world war ii. we begin with alex thompson of britain's channel 4. he joins us from sendai, japan. alex, t
escalates. >> the world bank says the disaster in japan could cost the economy $235 billion. >>> and the making of a major tie-up in the telecoms industry, can at&t and t-mobile convince regulators to give their proposed merger a go ahead. >>> an international coalition has brought themselves to moammar gadhafi doorstep. coalition spokespeople say ed c ka cak moammar gadhafi was not the target. qatar is making a direct contribution to the air strike with four of its fighter planes. the no-fly zone is intended to protect libyan civilians. coalition forces have pro-gadhafi supporters outside bengahzi, now an erie quiet has settled over the city. >> the impact of the no-fly zone is being felt in the city of bengahzi from 20 miles, 30 kilometers on the outskirts, air strikes brought moammar gadhafi military machine to a halt. the debris spanning miles. at least 70 vehicles that we counted were destroyed ranging from armored pe eed personnel c to tanks with their turrets off. many people are expressing their gratitude to the international community for finally intervening. they b
and this is world business today. as radiation fears spread in japan, residents are warned to stay away from the nuclear power plant while shares in tokyo electric power sink. >>> investors kept their cash close to home. now as the region reels from protests, where will the money go next? >>> and japan airlines emerges from bankruptcy administration. we'll tell you the price it's paid. >> for now let's take you straight over to the stock market action here in europe. and we're 62 minutes into the trading day. here's how it looks right now. we are seeing modest gains right across the board. between about .25% to .6%. the dax was hit initially by the chance angela merkel has suffered a defeat. move on to the currency markets because that's affecting the euro, as well. and here we are. we're looking at 1.4074, 1.5983, just a shade under 160 for the cable. a bit of a weakness. and the japanese yen at 80.66. pauline? >>> well, charles, the markets here in asia finished mostly lower this session. the shanghai composite was the only to post gains boosted by financial stocks. uranium producers and m
populated areas. it's not over. it's incredibly difficult technically and for people here in japan and around the world. there are arguments about the quality of information and disagreements among u.s. and japanese engineers how to proceed, even though it is japan's reactors. >> when we talk about the fact they changed the level from 4 to 5, what goes onto the science and reasoning behind why they felt they needed to raise this level? >> it's simple. three-mile island, i would say this is worse of three-mile island. three-mile island released almost no radiation. three-mile island was bad because it was only caught at the last minute before there was a huge melting of the core of the reactor. the definition of the levels, it doesn't just affect the reactor but affects the surrounding areas with bits of radiation being found japan in miniscule amounts in the plume across the pacific ocean. >> bob bazell, thank you very much. this situation becoming dire. explain if the fuel rods in one or more of the reactors have, in fact, been exposed, what does that mean? can they still be coole
there is a >>> good evening tonight from the coast of japan where all of us at abc news are bringing you a story we have never seen before. we know the crushing impact of that earthquake and the tsunami that swept away thousands and thousands of lives, but word tonight of an issue at a nuclear site which at the very least could be uncharted territory. there are three reactors at one location in trouble. we know that two had explosions releasing some radiation, and now word that at a third reactor, uranium rods with core heat of 3,400 degrees have been partially or perhaps entirely exposed raising the question of a nuclear power meltdown. the japanese have now called in american nuclear experts and the international atomic energy agency. even as those new images remind us of the violent events on friday, in the north an entire town whose houses rode the rapids today flattened by the water. a minivan, no match for the jet speed waves, and this is what the passengers saw as the brown waters overwhelmed the airport as they waited to board their plane. our team is out across
of the facility have been told to stay inside. japan has imposed a no-fly zone over that area for commercial air traffic. the white house, meanwhile, says the u.s. is not calling on americans to leave tokyo because of radiation concerns. and u.s. officials say it's unlikely dangerous levels of radiation will reach hawaii or the u.s. mainland. we have extensive coverage of the disaster in japan beginning with harry smith on the nuclear crisis. >> reporter: after a day of sharp spikes, radiation levels at the earthquake stricken fukushima dai-ichi nuclear plant are said to be falling. this morning there are reports of a new fire at the plant. people throughout japan are on edge. >> ( translated ): they say we are safe but it makes me wonder. it is really safe? >> reporter: japan's prime minister, naoto kan, tried to reassure his country but he said more radiation leaks are likely and ordered those in the danger zone to seal themselves indoors. american sean scisle says his plan is to get out while he can. >> last night we packed bags in case of an emergency and, you know, just better safe than sor
. hi, everybody. i'm thomas roberts. the watching and waiting continues in japan where the devastation continues, and the big question remains how dangerous is the radiation leaking from that country's nuclear plants in we're going to cover things from all angles. officials in japan say there's no plans to expand the evacuation around the crippled fukushima daiichi plant. there's now a crew of 300 people working in shifts trying desperately to contain the radiation. robert bazzell is nbc news chief science and environment correspondent, he joins us now. >> well, thomas, it's bad, because it's out of control. there has not been a major radiation leak yet outside of the workers inside -- the government today set only one of the workers had receive what could be considered a medically significant amount of radiation. so there has yet to be any significant rad yags leak, according to the officials. the problem is at least 4 of the 6 reactors are out of control in some way or another, and they could explode or melt or release large amounts of radiation into the environment, and that's the b
aftershocks. japan's index, the nikkei nose dived. the stock average fell 10.6%, down as much as 14% off one point during the day as worries of more reactor explosions increased. tokyo electric power stock, the owner of these reactors fell nearly 25% today. a look at our markets today, as you see, red arrows across the board. the dow jones down by 215 points. it's only 11:00 a.m. it's a reaction to what we have seen overseas and many market analysts did expect this. i'm thomas roberts. great to have you with me. japanese officials did raise the death toll to more than 2,700 people today but thousands more are still missing and boys continue to wash ashore. 400,000 people are homeless battling cold and windy conditions. nbc's ian williams is innia ma ga ta with the latest on the rescue and aid operations. >> good morning from yamagata air base where u.s. smirlt officers are in discussion about aid for survivors of the disaster. this could become a forward operating base for a major u.s. marine operation. we witnessed a navy c-130 transport aircraft fly in earlier. a heavy lift aircraft capabl
that people are picking up now who have been traveling around in japan, at least they were working at the nuclear facility, are minuscule. there is a lot of radiation at the site, but there's not a lot of radiation in the environment. there's very sensitive instruments to measure it, but it does not mean that the level is a health threat. now, the big concern right now is that here in tokyo, because this is now downwind, the winds have shifted. usually, they have been pushing the radiation out to sea. now the winds are aiming at tokyo. and 30 million people live in the greater tokyo area. and so if there were to be a massive release now, it's a big deal. so there's a lot of fear about that issue around here. >> and so, bob, given what the japanese government has said so far, i mean, they're telling people within a 19-mile radius to stay inside. our government is telling americans 50 miles away, no, get out. do the japanese people trust their government is going to protect them? >> reporter: well, some do and some don't, of course. and there's a lot of people who have already left t
in japan. a short time ago, the japanese government told the iaea that its engineers have been able to lay an external power cable at one of the reactors at the fukushima plant. now, this means they hope to reconnect power as soon as they are done spraying water on unit number three. earlier today, workers dumped thousands of gallons of water on the reactors by helicopter. the flights were stopped after the government realized they were not helping cool the unit down. they're still spraying water on reactors from the ground. the u.s. military is sending a nine-member team to japan, as early as today, to help evacuate -- to evaluate the nuclear situation. it's not clear if they will go to the plant that's been damaged. president obama is due to make a statement at 3:30 eastern time. joining me now is a physicist who has worked on nuclear reactor accident simulations. thank you for joining us. >> nice to be here. >> let's talk about this breaking news at this power cable may be down very soon and this could finally provide some power to unit number three. one of those -- unit number two, exc
>>> good evening from japan. this is "world news." where we see dawn break over the vast devastation. new images of the fury of the tsunami as we fly into the region obliterated by a tower. millions of people lining up for food, water, sheltary and now tonight urgent escalating questions about problems at the nuclear power site. a second explosion at a third reactor volcanically hot fuel rods exposed. families line up for radiation tests asking what are the chances of a catastrophic nuclear meltdown? and amid the worry help starts to arrive. everyone hopes for still one more incredible rescue. >>> good evening tonight from the coast of japan where all of us at abc news are bringing you a story we have never seen before. we know the crushing impact of that earthquake and the tsunami that swept away thousands and thousands of lives, but word tonight of an issue at a nuclear site which at the very least could be uncharted territory. there are three reactors at one location in trouble. we know that two had explosions releasing some radiation and now word that at a third react
japanese meltdown. the country of japan is confronting a grim reality three days after the massive earthquake and tsunami. thousands of bodies are washing up on the shore. the death toll is likely to go over 10,000 dead. for many who survived the catastrophe there's no power, no running water and very little food. the disaster in japan is three fold. humanitarian. economic. but also nuclear. after several explosions at a nuclear reactor increased the threat of meltdown. we'll get the latest from the earthquake zone at the top of the show. plus the nuclear crisis. can meltdown be avoided. what meltdown fears in japan mean for nuclear energy here in america. later relief effort. overwhelming and i country that hasn't seen this level hardship since world war ii. we begin with alex thompson. he joins us from sendai, japan. alex, tell us what you've seen. it's quite dramatic. >> reporter: i've covered disasters around the world and warriors for 22 years. i've never seen anything quite on the scale of this. let me give you one example of a town that we went to. you walk in and you can't
. and we will as well. >>> back to the story that -- the radiation from the fallout in that crisis in japan. the radiation has now reached southern california. but the u.s. officials are saying it's a billion times beneath the levels that would threaten anyone's health. japanese officials raised the fukushima accident level from four to five. that means they consider it on par with our own three mile island incident. frantic efforts continue to con taint situation at the daiichi plant. the u.s. military says japan requested an unmanned high altitude reconnaissance aircraft to fly over the troubled plant. that drone is equipped with infrared sensors that can take pictures and get a better understanding what's happening inside the reactor. >>> getting aid to northeastern japan has finally gotten easier. the port of sendai partially reopened. a ship brought in a large container of supplies for hundreds of thousands of people living in shelters. a small measure now of comfort exactly a week after the disaster struck. >>> a week ago today, people rushed out of buildings as a magnitude 9.0 earthq
its highest level in two weeks. while the nasdaq gained 14. >>> the disaster in japan is forcing toyota to slow its production here in the u.s. the world's biggest automaker told employees and dealers wednesday that due to supply disruptions from asia, it expects to halt production at some u.s. factories. the company did not indicate the size or pace of the slowdown, but it is expected to be somewhat limited since most toyotas made in this country use parts made in america. >>> new worries this morning about the housing market, after sales of new homes fell to the lowest on record. sales fell 17% in february, the third straight monthly decline. and the worst since they started keeping records 50 years ago. the median home sale price fell to $202,000. in response, many builders are cutting their prices and building less expensive homes. >>> united and continental airlines are finally rolling out in-flight wi-fi. they are the last major carriers to offer the service to most of their passengers. the two airlines merged last year. 95 live tv stations will also be available. >>> and b
northern japan, collapsing buildings, spawning fires, and causing a major tsunami that brings death and destruction to dozens of cities. that tsunami now moving across the pacific ocean. the entire west coast, from hawaii to alaska, is under a tsunami warning. this morning, we are live in japan with the very latest on the damage, and we'll tell you just how much of the u.s. could be at risk. "early" this friday morning, be at risk. "early" this friday morning, march 11th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> those pictures and that sound give you a very good idea of just what people in japan are dealing with this morning. those shots, of course, of the magnitude 8.9 quake which hit just about 2:46 local time. >> the images, as you can see, are devastating. and that quake triggered a tsunami. some waves reported as high as 30 feet high, and that wall of mud just sweeping away everything in its path right now. the death toll in the area is on the rise. buildings in tokyo, which are currently on fire right now, 4 million buildings in the region without power. so this is a devastating sit
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 250 (some duplicates have been removed)